6/10/2005

Great-crested Flycatcher

Migration Monitoring at TTP-June 3-9

This is the final update for spring 2005 as our last day of coverage was June 9. We will re-open the research station in early August for fall migration.
 
Given the unusually high level of bird actively last week at TTPBRS we weren't quite sure what to expect during our final week. Not surprisingly the remaining days of the spring season were quiet as banding totals peaked at 30 on June 5 and reached a low of just 3 on June 9! The primary species encountered in the first half of the period were Gray-cheeked and Swainson's Thrush, Magnolia, Wilson's and Yellow Warbler. Rather suddenly on June 5 the Yellow-bellied Flycatchers finally arrived at the station as 7 were banded on this day followed by 7 on the 6th and 3 on the 7th. Small numbers of Traill's Flycatcher were also associated with this movement. Unfortunately, a late push of Red-eyed Vireo didn't occur during the final week. Capture totals of this species were way down from last years total of 60, only 5 were banded this year. For the final few days of coverage migrating birds were hard to find as point count and census surveys yielded mostly breeding birds.
 
Recovery-As mentioned earlier in the season on May 18 we recaptured an ASY male American Redstart that was not banded at TTPBRS. We have discovered that the bird was originally banded on September 29, 2000 in Georgia, U.S.A. Based on all TTPBRS recoveries, this one is the furthest in terms of distance from the station and also the oldest (~4.5 years between banding and recovery). 
 
Acknowledgement-It has been another great season at Tommy Thompson Park and volunteers and staff can be proud of what was accomplished. Our coverage was excellent once again and we were able to offer interpretive talks and bird banding demonstrations to 363 people! As it turns out, spring 2005 was our busiest spring on record (2003-2005), however our totals were remarkably similar to spring 2004 (see below). Many thanks are due to the volunteers and to Seabrooke Leckie for their essential support this season!
 
HIGHLIGHTS
Banding
 
June 4
1-Eastern Wood Pewee
June 5
7-Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
5-Traill's Flycatcher
1-Great-crested Flycatcher
1-Wood Thrush
June 6
2-Gray-cheeked Thrush
1-Lincoln's Sparrow (late)
June 7
1-Red-eyed Vireo
1-Black-throated Green Warbler (late)
 
Observations
 
June 3
4-Blackpoll Warbler
June 4
20-Cedar Waxwing
June 5
1-Common Loon
10-Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
1-Black-throated Green Warbler
June 6
1-Black-bellied Plover
June 7
1-Yellow-billed Cuckoo
 
Season Banding Total
2005-2544
2004-2519
 
Season Species Total
2005-172
2004-172
 
Dan Derbyshire
Coordinator, Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station (TTPBRS)
Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA)
 
TTPBRS Sightings: http://tboweb.blogspot.com/
 
 
 
 
 
 

6/09/2005

June 9-End of Season

Spring 2005 has drawn to a close as today was our final day of coverage. Fittingly, we caught a total of 4 birds today, 2 Swainson's Thrush, 1 American Goldfinch and a Yellow Warbler Recapture. There were few migrants today but many busy adults tending eggs and nestlings! Also, our resident pair of Chickadee's finally fledged young today!

Here's to another great season and thanks to all the volunteers who made it possible!

Dan Derbyshire

6/07/2005

Recovery-American Redstart

As mentioned earlier in the season on May 18 we recaptured an ASY male American Redstart that was not banded by us. I found out today that the bird was originally banded on September 29, 2000 in Georgia, U.S.A. Based on all TTPBRS recoveries, this one is both the furthest in terms of distance from the station and also the oldest (~4.5 years between banding and recovery).

6/05/2005

Update-June 5

Just when you think migration has completely abated we band 7 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher amongst 30 birds! This was one of our better empidonax flycatcher days as reasonably good numbers of Traill's and Least's were observed and banded as well. The only migrant warbler species seen or caught were Chestnut-sided Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler and American Redstart.
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 

6/03/2005

Mourning Warbler

Migration Monitoring at TTP-May 27-June 2

The final week of May and first week of June are typically slower paced for bird migration although the period is important for late spring migrants such as thrushes, vireos, flycatchers and a few warbler species. The absence of Philadelphia Vireo in Spring 2005 was alleviated on May 27 when our first of spring 2005 was banded.  Respectable numbers of Least Flycatcher (5) and Swainson's Thrush (13) were caught and banded on this day. Given the late date the 129 birds banded on May 28 was a surprise as this ended up being our busiest day of the spring! In 2004 our busiest day was May 10 which is more typical for southern Ontario. Primary species captured on the day were 42 Swainson's Thrush, 6 Gray-cheeked Thrush, 1 Tennessee Warbler,18 Magnolia Warbler, 8 Wilson's Warbler and 5 Lincoln's Sparrow. An impressive 17 warbler species were also tallied which is fairly late for such diversity. Migration was strong on the 29th and 30th as 60 and 69 birds were banded respectively. The 30th featured solid counts of flycatchers including 2 Yellow-bellied, 7 Eastern Wood Pewee, 5 Alder, 5 Willow, 7 Traill's (banded) and 6 Least. A very late female Ruby-crowned Kinglet was banded on this day. The date was unusual as was the fact that it had a brood patch which suggests that it might be breeding nearby (possible but unlikely). Oddly, a Golden-crowned Kinglet was observed the previous day which is an extremely late date for the species. Another 68 birds were banded on the 31st and one of the the highlights was 3 Canada Warbler. Bird numbers dropped considerably on June 1 when just 8 species of warbler were detected. A single Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, 3 Mourning Warbler and 3 Wilson's were banded on the day. Also on the 1st, a lone Common Nighthawk was sighted just before dawn. June 2nd was equally slow as 27 birds were banded and the vast majority of activity was from local breeders. A Yellow-billed Cuckoo was observed on the north trail which was the first detected this spring. Overall it was a very good week given the lateness of spring, in fact this may turn out to be one of our busiest periods of the entire season!
 
The 42 Swainson's Thrushes banded on the 28th was a record one day total for the species at the research station, the previous being 25 on May 29th in 2003! Given the abundance of thrushes in both spring and fall it is clear that Tommy Thompson Park is an important stopover site for catharus thrushes. Based on the banding data from all years, Hermit Thrush is the 5th most commonly banded species at TTPBRS while Swainson's ranks 7th.
 
HIGHLIGHTS
 
Banding
May 27
1-Philadelphia Vireo
1-Red-eyed Vireo
1-Scarlet Tanager
28
1-Ruby-throated Hummingbird (captured and released unbanded)
42-Swainson's Thrush
2-Wood Thrush
7-Chestnut-sided Warbler
18-Magnolia Warbler
2-Myrtle Warbler
1-White-throated Sparrow (late)
29
3-Black-throated Green Warbler
4-Canada Warbler
30
2-Eastern Wood Pewee
7-Traill's Flycatcher
1-Ruby-crowned Kinglet (very late-last date was May 11 in 04)
1-Blue-headed Vireo
4-Mourning Warbler
31
5-Gray-cheeked Thrush
June 1
1-White-throated Sparrow
 
 
Observations
May 27
3-Whimbrel
12-Least Flycatcher
28
7-Red-eyed Vireo
14-Chestnut-sided Warbler
29-Magnolia Warbler
4-Myrtle Warbler (late)
5-Blackburnian Warbler
20-American Redstart
14-Wilson's Warbler
29
1-Golden-crowned Kinglet (very late-last date was April 22 in 04)
5-Philadelphia Vireo
1-Black-billed Cuckoo
30
8-Black-bellied Plover
3-Blue-headed Vireo
31
2-Common Loon
1-Northern Parula
June 1
1-Common Nighthawk
2
1-Yellow-billed Cuckoo
 
Season Banding Total
2005-2427
2004-2443
 
Season Species Total
2005-172
2004-172
 
Dan Derbyshire