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5/28/2005

Migration Monitoring Assistant-Seabrooke Leckie w/ American Woodcock

May 28

High migrant density detected this morning as 129 birds were banded, 10 recaptured and 3 captured-unbanded. The bird of the day was the Swainson's Thrush as a whopping 42 were banded. This is the most SWTH ever banded in one day at TTPBRS, the former record being of 25 banded on May 29-2003. High numbers of American Redstart (20 DST), Wilson's Warbler (8 band), Magnolia Warbler (18 band) and Traill's Flycatcher (5 band) were also recorded. 17 species of warbler were found along with increased totals of vireos and flycatchers. Still no sign of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers this spring........

Great day!

Dan Derbyshire

5/27/2005

Chestnut-sided Warbler (D.Derbyshire)
Indigo Bunting (S. Leckie)

Migration Monitoring at TTP-May 20-26

The week started off on a quiet note with 41 birds banded on the 20th. The highlight of the day was the 31 Grade 7 students who participated in our Bird Studies at Tommy Thompson Park Program. The first Cedar Waxwings (4) appeared on this day along with 2 late Pine Warblers. Warm and calm conditions on the 20th led to 80 birds banded on May 21. Bulk species from the nets were Swainson's Thrush (16), Ovenbird (9) and Northern Waterthrush (8). From the 22nd-25th ground level migration wound to a halt as cool and "northwindy" (new word!) weather swept into the Toronto area. A Juvenile American Woodcock was banded on the 22nd which is evidence of this species having bred successfully right under our noses. Migrants were scarce on the 24th as the capture totals reached a May low of 6! There were a few more birds to see on the 25th and luckily we were able to find our first Ruby-throated Hummingbird of the spring! Normally this species is a regular migrant at TTPBRS with 10-20 birds turning up in the nets from the first week through the third week of May. Continuing the trend of late arrivals and near "no shows" are Vireos and Flycatchers and a couple of warbler species. Thus far census and banding totals have been particularly meager in 2005 for Philadelphia, Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireo as well as Mourning and Black-throated Green Warbler. The first Tennessee Warbler of the season was banded on the 25th along with singles of Bay-breasted and Blackburnian and another Wood Thrush. The wind abated on the evening of the 25th which brought in another influx of migrants into Tommy Thompson. 86 birds were banded on the 26th which included 9 Gray Catbird, 12 Magnolia Warbler, 2 Mourning Warbler, 1 Indigo Bunting and 6 Lincoln's Sparrow. The most unusual sighting on the day was a Black Tern which was a first for TTPBRS and a rare sighting in the Toronto area!
 
HIGHLIGHTS
 
Banding
May 20
1-Black-throated Green Warbler (1 of few this spring!)
1-Purple Finch (4th banded at TTPBRS)
21
16-Swainson's Thrush
1-Wood Thrush
22
1-Wood Thrush
25
1-Wood Thrush
1-Tennessee Warbler
26
2-Mourning Warbler
11-Common Yellowthroat
3-Wilson's Warbler
1-Indigo Bunting (7th banded at TTPBRS)
6-Lincoln's Sparrow
 
 
Observations
May 20
4-Cedar Waxwing
2-Pine Warbler
21
2-Tennessee Warbler
19-Myrtle Warbler
6-Blackpoll Warbler
22
3-Blue-headed Vireo
23
1-Northern Parula
24
13-Common Loon
1-Peregrine Falcon
25
1-Long-tailed Duck (late)
1-Ruby-throated Hummingbird
26
1-Black Tern (1st for TTPBRS)
2-Alder Flycatcher
6-Gray-cheeked Thrush
22-Swainson's Thrush
5-Red-eyed Vireo
1-Orange-crowned Warbler
15-Chestnut-sided Warbler
 
Season Banding Total
2005-1978
2004-2198
 
Season Species Total
2005-166
2004-170
 
Dan Derbyshire
Coordinator, Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station (TTPBRS)
Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA)
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/25/2005

Banding Trainee-Steve Gillis
Tennessee Warbler
Magnolia Warbler

TVO Studio 2 aring

This program featured TTPBRS and SHOULD air tonight at 8pm on TVO.
 
Dan Derbyshire
Coordinator, Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station (TTPBRS)
Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA)
 
TTPBRS Sightings: http://tboweb.blogspot.com/
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/24/2005

Birds on Radar

The two images below show images taken from the doppler radar station in Buffalo, NY between the 20 and 21st of May. The first image depicts precipitation in the early evening of May 21st. Precipitation shows up on the radar images as "blocky" and with low pixelation. Bird activity at the station on the next morning (May 22) was very slow (29 birds banded). There is some dots centred around the radar which is probably ground clutter.

The second image is birds! Birds appear on the radar as less dense and blocky with a stippled appearance (more grainy). The image was taken at 10:45pm on the evening of May 20th. Not surprisingly we had one of our best days on the following morning May 21 (80+ banded).

You can click on the link below to check on the nocturnal migration during the evening and early morning hours during spring migration.

Dan Derbyshire

Birds on Radar May 21-Precipitation

Birds on Radar May 21-Precipation

Birds on Radar-10:45pm May 20

May 24

Migration has been halted by some unfavourable conditions. We have experienced very few warm pushes of weather the past two weeks and as a result our bird numbers have been lower than normal. May 23 and 24 were very quiet with mostly breeders and only a handful of migrants. Because of this we are still yet to see Mourning Warbler, Philadelphia Vireo and Alder Flycatcher. Hopefully the weather will turn and we will get some good totals for flycatchers, vireos and late spring warblers.
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/20/2005


Purple Finch (Seabrooke Leckie)

Cape May Warbler

Migration Monitoring at TTP-May 13-19

The past week started off with north winds and cool temperatures on the 13th and as a result few migrating birds were evident at Tommy Thompson Park. Yellow-rumped "Myrtle" Warbler was the most abundant species on the day (11 banded) and a captured Blue-winged Warbler was the highlight. A total of 58 birds were banded on the following morning which included 2 Wood Thrush, 1 Orange-crowned Warbler and 7 Western Palm Warbler. Spring 2005 is turning out to be a record season at TTPBRS for numbers of Wood Thrush as we have banded 7 this season (only 8 total from previous years). New arrivals on the 14th included Blackburnian Warbler, Indigo Bunting and Orange-crowned Warbler. Wind direction shifted to the south on the 15th and brought in a good number of migrants into the park which was appropriate timing for TRCA's annual "Bring Back the Birds Festival". Twenty-two warbler species were detected on the day and high numbers were evident for Nashville, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided and Ovenbird. 18 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks were tallied which is a record one day total for this species at TTPBRS. Unusual for peninsula D were 2 Eastern Bluebirds spotted near net 9. Some 80+ visitors were given banding demonstrations and introductions to TTPBRS activities! Highlights from the 16th were observations of a single Marsh Wren and Solitary Sandpiper. The doppler radar showed very heavy migration on the evening and early morning of the 18th. The result was our busiest day of the season thus far as 113 birds were banded. The diversity and abundance of birds was ideal for a visit from noted author and birder Kenn Kaufman and TV Ontario (TVO). Swainson's Thrush, Magnolia Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, American Redstart and Common Yellowthroat were the dominant species on the day. Most impressive was the unusually high number of Scarlet Tanagers, 2 were banded and 13 were observed! The Toronto Star came out on the 19th to take photos of the banding operation and interview staff of TTPBRS. Look for an article on Tommy Thompson Park in the coming weeks.
 
Overall it was a great week with lots of bird activity and events at TTPBRS! We still have not had a true "fallout" this spring but we are slightly ahead of last years pace. Average monthly banding totals are about the same however the "boom or bust" pattern of 2004 has not been evident this year. Rather, spring 2005 has been a more consistent season with more "average" days and less extremes. We still have 2.5 weeks remaining and therefore have much to discover yet!
 
 
HIGHLIGHTS
 
Banding
May 14
1-American Woodcock
2-Wood Thrush
1-Orange-crowned Warbler
15
2-Wood Thrush
1-Blue-winged Warbler
1-Golden-winged Warbler
1-Cape May Warbler
1-Canada Warbler
18
1-Great-crested Flycatcher
1-Bay-breasted Warbler
1-Blackpoll Warbler
12-Ovenbird
19
1-Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
2-Gray-cheeked Thrush
12-Swainson's Thrush
1-Hermit Thrush
1-Cape May Warbler
 
Observations
May 14
1-Canvasback
32-Myrtle Warbler
1-Indigo Bunting
5-Lincoln's Sparrow
15
5-Least Flycatcher
12-Veery
15-Chestnut-sided Warbler
2-Eastern Bluebird
16
1-Marsh Wren (3rd record for TTPBRS)
17
1-White-winged Scoter (late record)
40-Barn Swallow
2-Cliff Swallow
18
12-Gray Catbird
2-Northern Parula
24-Magnolia Warbler
26-American Redstart
13-Scarlet Tanager
10-Rose-breasted Grosbeak
1-Red-headed Woodpecker (4th record for TTPBRS)
19
1-Red-necked Grebe
 
Season Banding Total
2005-1697
2004-1587
 
Season Species Total
2005-160
2004-160
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/18/2005


Black-and-white Warbler

Scarlet Tanager

May 18

Another morning with heavy passage of migrants. The Buffalo NEXRAD (doppler) showed very high migrating bird density last night and therefore our busy day today was somewhat anticipated. Blackpoll and Bay-breasted Warbler were new arrivals along with a single Red-headed Woodpecker. We banded 113 birds of 30 species today. Ovenbird, American Redstart, Magnolia Warbler and Swainson's Thrush were recorded in high numbers today. We also captured a foreign banded American Redstart! The band was reported this evening but we may not hear back from the bird banding laboratory for at least a few days. In other news, we welcomed noted Ornithologist Kenn Kaufmann to the Bird Research Station. TVO was on hand for the event and did some filming (timing was excellent as we captured a male Scarlet Tanager while they were there!).
 
All in all another superb day of wonderland birding at TTPBRS!
 
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/15/2005

May 15

Today was TRCA's "Bring Back the Birds" Festival at Tommy Thompson Park. We managed to give demonstrations to about 80 park visitors! We also managed to band 86 birds and there was an excellent variety of species today. Wilson's, Northern Parula, Tennessee, Golden-winged and Canada Warbler were new arrivals as was 2 Eastern Bluebirds seen near net 9 (an unusual sighting for the research station). Good numbers of Scarlet Tanager and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks were also evident. TTPBRS personnel recorded 21 species of warbler today which is the highest one-day total of the season thus far.
 
Sighting from elsewhere on the spit included a Sandhill Crane near the footbridge and both Sora and Virginia Rail at the base (seen by Ralph Toninger and Greg Sadowski of TRCA).
 
Another Great Day at TTP!
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 

5/13/2005


Blue-winged Warbler-May 11

Migration Monitoring Update-May 6-12

Birding improved considerably during the past week, as many as 15 species of warbler can be found at Tommy Thompson Park although many species are still late. A respectable 54 birds were banded on the 6th of May, which featured the arrival of Lincoln's Sparrow, Common Yellowthroat and Wood Thrush. White-throated Sparrows were coming through in good numbers as evidenced by the 27 banded on this date. That being said, we still haven't experienced any big White-throat days in 2005. Highlights from the 7th included our first spring record of Cackling Goose as well as "Gambel's" White-crowned Sparrow. Banding totals dropped on the 8th as only 33 were banded, however we were delighted to see the first Baltimore Oriole and Blue-headed Vireo (April 26 arrival in 2004) of the year. The morning of the 9th featured a season high for Common Loon (8) and a good number of Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Yellow Warbler and White-crowned Sparrow. The 3 Eastern Towhees detected on the 10th was noteworthy. A shift in the weather (warm southerlies) produced a fallout on the 11th when 108 birds were banded of 33 species. A total of 14 new arrivals were detected on what was the best day of the spring to date! Record numbers of Wood Thrush (4) and Rusty Blackbird (2) were banded and the stations first Orchard Oriole was observed. Another 68 birds were banded on the 12th and the season's first Cape May, Magnolia and Red-breasted Nuthatch were found.
 
We are still lagging behind 2004 in terms of season totals but we are slowly gaining ground. Perhaps some of the storms forecasted for the next week will continue this trend.
 
HIGHLIGHTS
 
Banding
 
May 6
1-Lincoln's Sparrow
1-Common Yellowthroat
27-White-throated Sparrow
7
5-Ruby-crowned Kinglet
4-Western Palm Warbler
7-Swamp Sparrow
8
1-Gadwall (released unbanded)
9
1-Rose-breasted Grosbeak
10
1-Veery
11
1-Traill's Flycatcher
5-Veery
2-Swainson's Thrush
4-Wood Thrush
2-Chestnut-sided Warbler
1-Blue-winged Warbler
4-Northern Waterthrush
2-Rusty Blackbird (3rd and 4th banding records for TTPBRS)
12
1-Magnolia Warbler
 
Observations
May 6
15-Hermit Thrush
7
1-Cackling Goose
1-Black-bellied Plover
3-American Pipit
3-Warbling Vireo
8
1-Baltimore Oriole
1-Gray Catbird
1-Blue-headed Vireo
9
1-Great-crested Flycatcher
3-Bobolink
12-Yellow Warbler
4-Savannah Sparrow
2-Redhead
10
3-Eastern Towhee
11
4-Eastern Kingbird
7-Swainson's Thrush
8-Wood Thrush (record high total)
3-Red-eyed Vireo
2-Blue-winged Warbler
34-Yellow Warbler
11-Black-throated Blue Warbler
8-American Redstart
4-Ovenbird
2-Scarlet Tanager
1-Orchard Oriole (1st record for TTPBRS)
1-Fox Sparrow (late record)
12
1-Cape May Warbler
 
Season Banding Total
2005-1288
2004-1376
 
Season Species Total
2005-142
2004-153
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/12/2005


Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Dan Derbyshire)

5/11/2005

May 11

The day we have been waiting for! 108 birds were banded which was comprised of 33 species! 14 species of Warbler were detected the most numerous being Myrtles followed by Nashvilles and Yellows. 14 new arrivals appeared on the day and the highlight was an Orchard Oriole discovered by Ian Sturdee in the trees on the north side of the count area. This is the first record of OROR for TTPBRS. We also had 2 Blue-winged Warblers and a late Fox Sparrow.


Great Day!

5/09/2005

May 9

Numbers are down from late last week however overall species diversity is improving. New arrivals for today included a Bobolink, 3 Rose-breasted Grosbeak and a Great-crested Flycatcher. Only 3 species of Warbler were evident on Peninsula D. A survey of birds at the base and the Embayment A woods yielded more species of Warbler, the following were noted: Blue-winged, Nashville, Myrtle, Palm, Blackburnian, Black-throated Blue and Yellow.


Dan Derbyshire

5/07/2005

Some New Arrivals Today

Good variety of birds today, new arrivals included: 1 Cackling Goose, 1 Black-and-white Warbler, 1 "Gambel's" White-crowned Sparrow, 1 Black-bellied Plover and 1 Warbling Vireo.
 
Dan Derbyshire
 
 
 
 
 
 

Migration Monitoring at TTP-April 29-May 5

It was eerily quiet at Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station for the majority of the update period. Migration was almost unapparent from April 25-May 4 as birds were likely held further south by colder temperatures in the Great Lakes region. A Turkey Vulture was observed on May 1st, which is an unusual species for us and the first Common Grackles were banded on May 4. Ruby-crowned Kinglets are still coming through in small numbers although Golden-crowned Kinglets have largely departed the Toronto area.
 
Interestingly, most species are arriving later than normal at Tommy Thompson Park in 2005 (see below for comparison of 2005 vs.2004 Species Total). Yellow Warbler first appeared on April 23 in 2004 and as of May 4 this year none had appeared. However warmer air on May 5 produced several Yellow Warblers as well as the first White-crowned Sparrow, House Wren and Nashville Warbler. In all, 60 birds were banded on this day, which was dominated by Hermit Thrush and White-throated Sparrow. Indeed, the birds had finally arrived! With the floodgates now open we can look forward to many more new arrivals and the incoming waves of Yellow-rumped "Myrtle" Warblers and White-throated Sparrow.
 
HIGHLIGHTS
 
Banding
 
May 1
1-Brown Thrasher
1-Northern Waterthrush
May 5
17-Hermit thrush
3-Brown Thrasher
1-Nashville Warbler
2-Yellow Warbler
2-White-crowned Sparrow
 
Observations
 
April 29
4-Wood Duck
1-Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1-Western Palm Warbler
May 1
40-White-throated Sparrow
May 2
3-Rusty Blackbird
May 3
1-Cooper's Hawk
May 4
1-Peregrine Falcon
16-Myrtle Warbler
2-Purple Finch
May 5
25-Hermit Thrush
6-Chipping Sparrow
 
Season Banding Total
2005-873
2004-672
 
Season Species Total
2005-110
2004-129
 
Dan Derbyshire
Coordinator, Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station (TTPBRS)
Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA)
 
TTPBRS Sightings: http://tboweb.blogspot.com/
 
 
 
 
 
 

5/06/2005


Winter Wren (Dan Derbyshire)

Common Yellowthroat (Dan Derbyshire)

5/02/2005

foreign Recovery-Ruby-crowned Kinglet

I have just received word on our 7th foreign recovery. The HY Male Ruby-crowned Kinglet (2310-75634) banded at TTPBRS on October 10-2003 was recaptured at Rouge River Bird Observatory (RRBO), Dearborn, Michigan on April 22-2005. Interestingly, Rouge River Bird Observatory is another of just a handful or urban based migration monitoring stations in North America.
 
According to Canadian banding records this is just the 11th recovery from over 48,000 banded since 1921. Furthermore the Canadian Atlas of Bird Banding states that "This species has one of the lowest encounter rates of any bird".
 
Synopsis of Foreign Recoveries (birds originally banded at TTPBRS)
 
1.Northern Saw-whet Owl
Banded 11-08-03
Recovered 10-21-04 at Marais Laperriere, Quebec
 
2.Northern Saw-whet Owl
Banded 11-06-03
Recovered 03-03-04 at Rockwood, Ontario
 
3.Northern Saw-whet Owl
Banded 10-23-03
Recovered 10-27-03 at Long Point, Ontario
 
4.Northern Saw-whet Owl
Banded 10-23-03
Recovered 03-31-04 at Hamlin, New York
 
5.Northern Saw-whet Owl
Banded 10-22-03
Recovered 11-07-03 at Casselman River, Maryland
 
6.Black-capped Chickadee
Banded 10-22-03
Recovered 11-07-03 at Uxbridge, Ontario
 
7.Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Banded 10-10-03
Recovered 04-22-05 at Dearborn, Michigan
Dan Derbyshire
Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station
Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA)